Gilgit-Baltistan

Gilgit-Baltistan
Gilgit-Baltistan formerly known as the northern regions, is the largest political entity in northern Pakistan. It borders Pakistan's Khyber Pukhtunkhwa province to the west, Afghanistan Wakhan Corridor to the north, China to the north, south Azad Kashmir and the State of Jammu and Kashmir from India to South is. Gilgit-Baltistan covering an area of 72,971 km ² (28,174 km ²) and has a population estimated at about 1,000,000. Its administrative center is the city of Gilgit.
The territory becomes a single administrative unit in 1970 under the name of Northern Areas and was formed by the merger of the Agency of Gilgit, Baltistan District Wazarat Ladakh, and the states of Hunza and Nagar. Pakistan considers the separate territory of Kashmir, while India and the European Union consider the territory as part of broader disputed territory of Kashmir has been disputed between India and Pakistan since 1947.
 History
Rock art and petroglyphs:
There are over 20,000 pieces of rock art and petroglyphs all along the Karakoram Highway to Gilgit and Baltistan, focused on ten major sites between Hunza and Shatial. The carvings were left by various invaders, traders and pilgrims who passed along the trade route, and by the local population. The first dates back to between 5000 and 1000 BC, showing single animals, men and triangular hunting scenes where animals are larger than the hunters. These carvings were pecked into the rock with stone tools and are covered with a thick patina that proves their age. The archaeologist Karl Jettmar reconstructed the history of the area from various inscriptions and recorded his findings in rock carvings and inscriptions in the northern regions of Pakistan and later released between Gandhara and the Silk Roads - The rock carvings along the Karakoram Highway.
Before Pakistan's independence and partition of India in 1947, Maharaja Hari Singh extended his rule in Gilgit and Baltistan. After the partition, the Jammu and Kashmir in its entirety, remained an independent state. Pakistani parts of Kashmir to the north and west of the cease-fire initiated at the end of the Indo-Pakistani War of 1947, or line of control as it was later called, were divided into the North (72,971 square kilometers) in the north and the Pakistani state of Azad Kashmir (13.297 km ²) in the south. The name "Northwest Territories" was first used by the United Nations to designate the northern regions of Kashmir. A small portion of the northern territories, inland Shaksgam, was provisionally ceded by Pakistan to People's Republic of China in 1963.  
History
Rock art and petroglyphs:
There are over 20,000 pieces of rock art and petroglyphs all along the Karakoram Highway to Gilgit and Baltistan, focused on ten major sites between Hunza and Shatial. The carvings were left by various invaders, traders and pilgrims who passed along the trade route, and by the local population. The first dates back to between 5000 and 1000 BC, showing single animals, men and triangular hunting scenes where animals are larger than the hunters. These carvings were pecked into the rock with stone tools and are covered with a thick patina that proves their age. The archaeologist Karl Jettmar reconstructed the history of the area from various inscriptions and recorded his findings in rock carvings and inscriptions in the northern regions of Pakistan and later released between Gandhara and the Silk Roads - The rock carvings along the Karakoram Highway.
Before Pakistan's independence and partition of India in 1947, Maharaja Hari Singh extended his rule in Gilgit and Baltistan. After the partition, the Jammu and Kashmir in its entirety, remained an independent state. Pakistani parts of Kashmir to the north and west of the cease-fire initiated at the end of the Indo-Pakistani War of 1947, or line of control as it was later called, were divided into the North (72,971 square kilometers) in the north and the Pakistani state of Azad Kashmir (13.297 km ²) in the south. The name "Northwest Territories" was first used by the United Nations to designate the northern regions of Kashmir. A small portion of the northern territories, inland Shaksgam, was provisionally ceded by Pakistan to People's Republic of China in 1963.
Gilgit and Baltistan, which was more recently known as the northern regions, is currently composed of seven districts, has a population of nearly one million, has an area of approximately 28,000 square miles and shares borders with Pakistan, China, Afghanistan and India. The inhabitants of this remote region have been freed from the Dogra regime of the former princely state of Jammu and Kashmir, 1 November 1947, with the help of the Pakistani army and then became citizens of a state of self-release of very short duration independent (17 days only). The new state has asked the Pakistan government to provide necessary assistance in conducting its affairs as it had no administrative infrastructure of its own. The government of Pakistan has accepted the request and sent Sardar Muhammad Alam Khan, a deputy commissioner further NWFP, Gilgit. Sardar Muhammad Alam Khan then took over the administration of the territory as its first appointed political agent.
The local Northern Light Infantry is the army unit that was believed to have aided and perhaps participated in the Kargil conflict of 1999. Over 500 soldiers are believed to have been killed and buried in the North in that action.Lalak Jan, a Shiite Muslim Ismaili (Nizari) soldier Yasin Valley, was awarded the highest medal of Pakistan the Nishan-e-Haider for his courageous actions during the Kargil conflict.
Autonomous status and present-day Gilgit-Baltistan
On 29 August 2009, The Gilgit-Baltistan Empowerment and Self-Governance Order 2009 WAS Passed By The Pakistani cabinet and later Signed By The country's President. The self-rule order GRANTED To The People of the form Northern Areas, Gilgit-Baltistan Renamed now, by Creating, Among Other Things, Elected Annually Legislative Assembly. There has-been criticism and opposition to this move in Pakistan, India, and Gilgit-Baltistan.
Gilgit-Baltistan United Movement-while rejecting The New Demanded That year package-independent and Autonomous Legislative Assembly for Gilgit-Baltistan Should Be Formed With The Installation of Local Government Authorities as per The UNCIP resolutions, Where the people of Gilgit-Baltistan elect Their Will The Prime Minister and President.
In early September 2009, Pakistan year agreement Signed With The People's Republic of China for a mega energy project in Gilgit-Baltistan Which Includes the construction of a 7,000-megawatt dam at Bunji In The Astore District. This also resulted in protest from India, although Indian Concerns Immediately Were Rejected by Pakistan, Which Claimed Thats the Government of India has no locus standi in the Matter.
On 29 September 2009 The Pakistan Prime Minister, while Addressing a huge gathering in Gilgit-Baltistan Announced a multi-billion rupee development package Aimed At The Socio-Economic uplifting of People in the area. Development projects include The Will Areas of education, health, agriculture, tourism & the Basic Needs of life.The Prime Minister Further Went There to Say:
"You are getting your identity today. It is your right and your demand has-been, and today we are Fulfilling it.